The Lady of the Lakes by Josi S. Kilpack

The Lady of the Lakes by Josi Kilpack is historical fiction recounting the love story of Sir Walter Scott, one of Scotland’s most famous authors.

This easy-to-read tale begins in Edinburgh in 1791. Walter Scott is attending the Sunday morning service at Greyfriar’s Kirk when he is besotted with a beautiful girl in the congregation. Walter connives to introduce himself to this girl after the service, discovers her name is Mina, and obtains permission to walk her home under his umbrella. Thus begins a friendship that would lead to something more as the years, and the letters, went by.

In the ensuing years Walter spends his time working hard to find a way to be able to support a wife and family and thus be in a position to propose to Mina. Meanwhile Walter and Mina’s families both get wind of the romance and see trouble ahead if the two, who are from different social backgrounds, pursue a permanent union. Eventually Mina is persuaded by her family, and the attentions of a wealthy young suitor, to abandon her first love and let Walter go. Blindsided by this misfortune, Walter is utterly crushed and grows despondent.

Mina soon marries her wealthy suitor and Walter is left wallowing in his grief. A year later Walter’s brother and a friend convince him to accompany them on a trip south to England to explore the Cumberland lakes. While staying in Gilsland, a small town near Carlisle, the men happen upon a dance at the hotel where they are staying. There they glimpse a captivating Frenchwoman who appears to be on her own. Thus begins a whirlwind week of getting to know Miss Charlotte Carpenter.

Walter is quite taken by Charlotte, but Charlotte realizes his heart is still mourning Mina. Urged by her maid, Charlotte leaves Gilsland suddenly for Carlisle and tells Walter not to follow her. The relationship seems to be over until Walter is given advice to pursue what might be growing in his heart. Walter leaves for Carlisle immediately.

By the time Walter reaches Charlotte in Carlisle he has devised a plan. If Charlotte will agree, they will spend the next fifteen days in each other’s company and at the end of that time come to a decision as to whether or not they are suitable for each other and should marry. Charlotte receives wise counsel from her hostess to proceed with this arrangement and willingly accepts Walter’s proposition. Thus commences fifteen days of dinners, horse rides, and trips to the theatre. As the time draws to a close Walter finds his heart no longer aching after Mina but has been drawn deeply to Charlotte. Will Charlotte reciprocate his feelings for her? Will she agree to marry him, leave England, and move to wild Scotland?

Kilpack is careful to note at the back of this book what parts of each chapter are based on facts and what parts are of her own imagination. This book makes for an enjoyable way to learn more about the life of Sir Walter Scott and the women who shaped his life.

Travel Notes: this book would be an excellent choice to read before a visit to Abbotsford, Sir Walter Scott’s home in the Scottish Borders.

 

The Silver Darlings by Neil Gunn

The Silver Darlings by Neil Gunn is an epic novel set in Caithness during the highland clearances at the beginning of the herring boom.

The novel follows the life of Finn beginning before his birth with his father’s sudden capture by a press gang while out fishing for herring off the coast of Scotland and continuing through to Finn’s coming of age and eventual marriage. As Gunn weaves this story of history, heartache, and a culture’s attachment to the sea we get a glimpse into the life of the men and women who learned to make a living from the unpredictable sea.

Catrine, Finn’s mother, is a major character in the novel. It is Catrine who must forge a way for herself and her child after her husband’s abduction. Together she and Finn survive the plague that hits their village and when Finn comes of age and longs to become a fisherman it is Catrine who must face her dread of the loss which the sea can cause.

One major theme of the novel is how Catrine and Finn’s relationship plays out, especially as a close friend of the family, Roddie, makes known his intentions to marry Catrine. This intention affects Finn’s relationship with his boyhood hero, Roddie, and with his mother.

Another major theme of the novel is Finn’s coming of age and how he grows into the responsibilities of adult. The reader watches as Finn is drawn inexplicably to the sea and becomes a leader among the other boys at sea. And we watch Finn wrestle with his attraction to Una, one of the young herring gutters. Finn must rise to maturity in all his relationships and come out ready to take on responsibility for his own household.

At nearly 600 pages long this book is no quick read. But, it is a worthwhile and enjoyable novel and Gunn has done a good job of keeping the book moving along. The reader will come away with vivid pictures of sailing on the open sea, of the crowds of women that met the boats as they returned with fish to process, and of the old way of life these fisher families belonged to.

Travel Notes: this is an excellent historical fiction choice if you want to learn more about the fishing that took place all around the Scottish coastline. This book is set in the area of Caithness but also includes travel to the Stornoway and the Outer Hebrides. This book was made into a movie by the same name in 1947. You can listen to a song about the herrings called The Silver Darlings here.